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Volume 4, Issue 4-1, July 2015, Page: 1-6
Review on Emerging and Reemerging Microbial Causes in Bovine Abortion
S. Parthiban, Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Veterinary College and Research Institute, Tamilnadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Tirunelveli-627 358, Tamilnadu, India
S. Malmarugan, Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Veterinary College and Research Institute, Tamilnadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Tirunelveli-627 358, Tamilnadu, India
M. S. Murugan, Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Veterinary College and Research Institute, Tamilnadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Tirunelveli-627 358, Tamilnadu, India
J. Johnson Rajeswar, Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Veterinary College and Research Institute, Tamilnadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Tirunelveli-627 358, Tamilnadu, India
P. Pothiappan, Department of Veterinary Microbiology, Veterinary College and Research Institute, Tamilnadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, Tirunelveli-627 358, Tamilnadu, India
Received: Apr. 13, 2015;       Accepted: Apr. 13, 2015;       Published: Apr. 23, 2015
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.s.2015040401.11      View  5434      Downloads  242
Abstract
This review summarizesemergingand re-emergingmajor bacterial, fungal, viral and protozoan causes of abortion in cattle. The clinical presentations of disease due to reproductive pathogens are emphasized, with afocus on assisting development of complete lists of major causes that result in abortion in cattle. Clinicians areencouraged to assess clinical presentation, create complete lists of differential diagnoses, obtain appropriate diagnostic samples, maximize diagnostic laboratory support, and avoid zoonotic infections resulting from reproductive pathogens of animals. Thefoundation of an accurate diagnosis of reproductive loss due to infectious pathogens facilitates the prudent use of immunization andbiosecurity to minimize reproductive losses.
Keywords
Emerging Pathogens, Re-Emerging Pathogens, Bovine, Abortion
To cite this article
S. Parthiban, S. Malmarugan, M. S. Murugan, J. Johnson Rajeswar, P. Pothiappan, Review on Emerging and Reemerging Microbial Causes in Bovine Abortion, International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences. Special Issue: Review on Novel Approaches for the Management of Emerging and Reemerging Livestock Diseases. Vol. 4, No. 4-1, 2015, pp. 1-6. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.s.2015040401.11
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