International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences

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Evaluation of Physical and Chemical Quality Characteristics of Elite Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotypes

Received: 11 July 2022    Accepted: 10 August 2022    Published: 24 August 2022
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Abstract

In wheat development programs, the evaluation and identification of superior lines from introduced plant materials, is the first and leading step in a crop improvement program. The study was conducted to evaluate the physical and chemical quality characteristics of elite bread wheat genotypes. The genotypes were consisted of 30 promising line obtained from the National Wheat Research Program during 2017 and 2018 two consecutive crops season consisted including two standard check. The experiment was conducted at Kulumsa Agricultural Research Center and genotypes were arranged in alpha lattice design with three replications. Analysis of variance showed significant (P < 0.001) differences among genotypes for all 14 agronomic and quality parameters. The results showed grain yield had a positive correlation with days to heading days to maturity, plant height (agronomic data), thousand kernel weight, hectoliter weight, grain kernel weight, grain hardness, grain diameter (grain physical quality) and flour protein content, wet gluten, gluten index, at both genotypic and phenotypic levels. However, grain yield (Ton/ha) showed a negative association with moisture content and dry gluten at both genotypic and phenotypic ratios and a wide range of variations for grain kernel weight, grain hardness, and dry gluten, wet gluten, and gluten index. Advanced genotypes had between 28.9 to 41.55mg-grain kernel weight, 53.87 to 84.93%-grain hardness, 2.51 to 2.94mm-grain kernel diameter, 12.68 to 14.83% protein content, 12.26 to 13.35% moisture content, 13.6 to 21% dry gluten, 31.2 to 42.3% wet gluten, and 64.34 to 85.73% gluten index. ETBW9554 showed superior overall agronomic performances over the standard check Wane and Hidasse and it had a 9% and 14% yield advantage respectively. The ETBW9554 had a plumper seed size than the two checks. ETBW9554 variety is known for its higher protein content than standard check Wane and local check Hidasse.

DOI 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20221104.12
Published in International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences (Volume 11, Issue 4, July 2022)
Page(s) 102-109
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Wheat, Genotype, Elite, Quality, Protein, Gluten

References
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    Cherinet Kasahun, Gadisa Alemu. (2022). Evaluation of Physical and Chemical Quality Characteristics of Elite Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotypes. International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences, 11(4), 102-109. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijnfs.20221104.12

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    ACS Style

    Cherinet Kasahun; Gadisa Alemu. Evaluation of Physical and Chemical Quality Characteristics of Elite Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotypes. Int. J. Nutr. Food Sci. 2022, 11(4), 102-109. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20221104.12

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    AMA Style

    Cherinet Kasahun, Gadisa Alemu. Evaluation of Physical and Chemical Quality Characteristics of Elite Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotypes. Int J Nutr Food Sci. 2022;11(4):102-109. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20221104.12

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ijnfs.20221104.12,
      author = {Cherinet Kasahun and Gadisa Alemu},
      title = {Evaluation of Physical and Chemical Quality Characteristics of Elite Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotypes},
      journal = {International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences},
      volume = {11},
      number = {4},
      pages = {102-109},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ijnfs.20221104.12},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijnfs.20221104.12},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ijnfs.20221104.12},
      abstract = {In wheat development programs, the evaluation and identification of superior lines from introduced plant materials, is the first and leading step in a crop improvement program. The study was conducted to evaluate the physical and chemical quality characteristics of elite bread wheat genotypes. The genotypes were consisted of 30 promising line obtained from the National Wheat Research Program during 2017 and 2018 two consecutive crops season consisted including two standard check. The experiment was conducted at Kulumsa Agricultural Research Center and genotypes were arranged in alpha lattice design with three replications. Analysis of variance showed significant (P < 0.001) differences among genotypes for all 14 agronomic and quality parameters. The results showed grain yield had a positive correlation with days to heading days to maturity, plant height (agronomic data), thousand kernel weight, hectoliter weight, grain kernel weight, grain hardness, grain diameter (grain physical quality) and flour protein content, wet gluten, gluten index, at both genotypic and phenotypic levels. However, grain yield (Ton/ha) showed a negative association with moisture content and dry gluten at both genotypic and phenotypic ratios and a wide range of variations for grain kernel weight, grain hardness, and dry gluten, wet gluten, and gluten index. Advanced genotypes had between 28.9 to 41.55mg-grain kernel weight, 53.87 to 84.93%-grain hardness, 2.51 to 2.94mm-grain kernel diameter, 12.68 to 14.83% protein content, 12.26 to 13.35% moisture content, 13.6 to 21% dry gluten, 31.2 to 42.3% wet gluten, and 64.34 to 85.73% gluten index. ETBW9554 showed superior overall agronomic performances over the standard check Wane and Hidasse and it had a 9% and 14% yield advantage respectively. The ETBW9554 had a plumper seed size than the two checks. ETBW9554 variety is known for its higher protein content than standard check Wane and local check Hidasse.},
     year = {2022}
    }
    

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  • TY  - JOUR
    T1  - Evaluation of Physical and Chemical Quality Characteristics of Elite Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Genotypes
    AU  - Cherinet Kasahun
    AU  - Gadisa Alemu
    Y1  - 2022/08/24
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    DO  - 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20221104.12
    T2  - International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
    JF  - International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
    JO  - International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
    SP  - 102
    EP  - 109
    PB  - Science Publishing Group
    SN  - 2327-2716
    UR  - https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijnfs.20221104.12
    AB  - In wheat development programs, the evaluation and identification of superior lines from introduced plant materials, is the first and leading step in a crop improvement program. The study was conducted to evaluate the physical and chemical quality characteristics of elite bread wheat genotypes. The genotypes were consisted of 30 promising line obtained from the National Wheat Research Program during 2017 and 2018 two consecutive crops season consisted including two standard check. The experiment was conducted at Kulumsa Agricultural Research Center and genotypes were arranged in alpha lattice design with three replications. Analysis of variance showed significant (P < 0.001) differences among genotypes for all 14 agronomic and quality parameters. The results showed grain yield had a positive correlation with days to heading days to maturity, plant height (agronomic data), thousand kernel weight, hectoliter weight, grain kernel weight, grain hardness, grain diameter (grain physical quality) and flour protein content, wet gluten, gluten index, at both genotypic and phenotypic levels. However, grain yield (Ton/ha) showed a negative association with moisture content and dry gluten at both genotypic and phenotypic ratios and a wide range of variations for grain kernel weight, grain hardness, and dry gluten, wet gluten, and gluten index. Advanced genotypes had between 28.9 to 41.55mg-grain kernel weight, 53.87 to 84.93%-grain hardness, 2.51 to 2.94mm-grain kernel diameter, 12.68 to 14.83% protein content, 12.26 to 13.35% moisture content, 13.6 to 21% dry gluten, 31.2 to 42.3% wet gluten, and 64.34 to 85.73% gluten index. ETBW9554 showed superior overall agronomic performances over the standard check Wane and Hidasse and it had a 9% and 14% yield advantage respectively. The ETBW9554 had a plumper seed size than the two checks. ETBW9554 variety is known for its higher protein content than standard check Wane and local check Hidasse.
    VL  - 11
    IS  - 4
    ER  - 

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Author Information
  • Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Food Science and Nutrition Research Directorate, Kulumsa Agricultural Research Center, Assela, Ethiopia

  • Ethiopian Institute of Agricultural Research, Crop Directorate, Kulumsa Agricultural Research Center, Assela, Ethiopia

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