International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences

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The Effect of Different Processing Methods on the Proximate, β- Carotene and Ascorbate Composition of Fluted Pumpkin (Telfairia Occidentalis) Leaves and its Product, the Leaf Curd

Received: 18 August 2014    Accepted: 23 August 2014    Published: 30 August 2014
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Abstract

The study examined effect of different processing methods on the proximate, β-carotene and ascorbate composition of fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis) leaf and the curd produced from the leaf. Fluted pumpkin leaf was divided into four (4) portions. One was shade-dried, another was sun-dried and the other was used to produce leaf curd. The last portion was not processed and served as the control. All the processed samples were milled to fine flour and analysed using standard assay methods. The results showed that the fresh leaf curd (FLC) sample had the highest protein (26.27%) and the fresh pumpkin leaf (FPL) had the least (11.25%). On the other hand, the dried leaf curd (DLC), the shade-dried and the sun-dried fluted pumpkin leaves had comparable (p>0.05) values (19.75 vs 23.08 vs 23.78%). The fat composition of the samples differed. The dried leaf curd samples had the least fat (0.93%) followed by fresh leaf curd (3.03%). The shade dried leaf had the highest fat (ether extract), which was different from others (p<0.05). The dried leaf curd had the least ash (1.21%). The fibre composition followed the same trend as that of ash and fat. The fresh pumpkin leaf had the highest ash and fibre (17.72%) and least carbohydrate (CHO) (51.27%). The shade dried and sun-dried fluted pumpkin leaves had comparable (p>0.05) ash values (3.47 and 3.00%, respectively) and the dried leaf curd had the least (1.29%). The CHO levels of the samples differed (p<0.05). The fresh pumpkin leaves had comparable (p>0.05) values (61.30-62.87%). However, the dried leaf curd had the highest CHO (76.99%) (p<0.05). The β-carotene level of the samples differed. The values ranged from 0.88 to 83.57 μg/g. The sun-dried samples had significantly lower (p<0.05) β-carotene (0.88 μg/g) than the other samples (p<0.05). On the other hand, the fresh leaf curd had the highest (p<0.05) pro-vitamin A level. Shade-dried samples had higher β-carotene than the sun-dried (41.09 vs 0.88 μg/g). The ascorbate composition of the five samples differed. The dried leaf curd and the sun-dried sample had similar ascorbate (0.16 and 0.18 mg/100g) while the shade dried and fresh leaves had similar (p>0.05) levels (0.28 mg/100g respectively). On the other hand, the fresh leaf curd had significantly higher values (p<0.05) than the others. These study have revealed the proximate, beta-carotene and ascorbate composition of fluted pumpkin processed in different methods, hence, this is a vital tool in the hand of nutritionist and dietitians for proper management of patients and nutrition education.

DOI 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20140305.17
Published in International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences (Volume 3, Issue 5, September 2014)
Page(s) 404-410
Creative Commons

This is an Open Access article, distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, provided the original work is properly cited.

Copyright

Copyright © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Science Publishing Group

Keywords

Processing Methods, Proximate, Beta - Carotene, Ascorbate, Fluted Pumpkin

References
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    Onoja, Ifeoma U. (2014). The Effect of Different Processing Methods on the Proximate, β- Carotene and Ascorbate Composition of Fluted Pumpkin (Telfairia Occidentalis) Leaves and its Product, the Leaf Curd. International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences, 3(5), 404-410. https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijnfs.20140305.17

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    ACS Style

    Onoja; Ifeoma U. The Effect of Different Processing Methods on the Proximate, β- Carotene and Ascorbate Composition of Fluted Pumpkin (Telfairia Occidentalis) Leaves and its Product, the Leaf Curd. Int. J. Nutr. Food Sci. 2014, 3(5), 404-410. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20140305.17

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    AMA Style

    Onoja, Ifeoma U. The Effect of Different Processing Methods on the Proximate, β- Carotene and Ascorbate Composition of Fluted Pumpkin (Telfairia Occidentalis) Leaves and its Product, the Leaf Curd. Int J Nutr Food Sci. 2014;3(5):404-410. doi: 10.11648/j.ijnfs.20140305.17

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  • @article{10.11648/j.ijnfs.20140305.17,
      author = {Onoja and Ifeoma U.},
      title = {The Effect of Different Processing Methods on the Proximate, β- Carotene and Ascorbate Composition of Fluted Pumpkin (Telfairia Occidentalis) Leaves and its Product, the Leaf Curd},
      journal = {International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences},
      volume = {3},
      number = {5},
      pages = {404-410},
      doi = {10.11648/j.ijnfs.20140305.17},
      url = {https://doi.org/10.11648/j.ijnfs.20140305.17},
      eprint = {https://article.sciencepublishinggroup.com/pdf/10.11648.j.ijnfs.20140305.17},
      abstract = {The study examined effect of different processing methods on the proximate, β-carotene and ascorbate composition of fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis) leaf and the curd produced from the leaf.  Fluted pumpkin leaf was divided into four (4) portions. One was shade-dried, another was sun-dried and the other was used to produce leaf curd. The last portion was not processed and served as the control. All the processed samples were milled to fine flour and analysed using standard assay methods. The results showed that the fresh leaf curd (FLC) sample had the highest protein (26.27%) and the fresh pumpkin leaf (FPL) had the least (11.25%). On the other hand, the dried leaf curd (DLC), the shade-dried and the sun-dried fluted pumpkin leaves had comparable (p>0.05) values (19.75 vs 23.08 vs 23.78%). The fat composition of the samples differed. The dried leaf curd samples had the least fat (0.93%) followed by fresh leaf curd (3.03%). The shade dried leaf had the highest fat (ether extract), which was different from others (p0.05) ash values (3.47 and 3.00%, respectively) and the dried leaf curd had the least (1.29%). The CHO levels of the samples differed (p0.05) values (61.30-62.87%). However, the dried leaf curd had the highest CHO (76.99%) (p0.05) levels (0.28 mg/100g respectively). On the other hand, the fresh leaf curd had significantly higher values (p<0.05) than the others. These study have revealed the proximate, beta-carotene and ascorbate composition of fluted pumpkin processed in different methods, hence, this is a vital tool in the hand of nutritionist and dietitians for proper management of patients and nutrition education.},
     year = {2014}
    }
    

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    T1  - The Effect of Different Processing Methods on the Proximate, β- Carotene and Ascorbate Composition of Fluted Pumpkin (Telfairia Occidentalis) Leaves and its Product, the Leaf Curd
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    T2  - International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
    JF  - International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
    JO  - International Journal of Nutrition and Food Sciences
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    PB  - Science Publishing Group
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    AB  - The study examined effect of different processing methods on the proximate, β-carotene and ascorbate composition of fluted pumpkin (Telfairia occidentalis) leaf and the curd produced from the leaf.  Fluted pumpkin leaf was divided into four (4) portions. One was shade-dried, another was sun-dried and the other was used to produce leaf curd. The last portion was not processed and served as the control. All the processed samples were milled to fine flour and analysed using standard assay methods. The results showed that the fresh leaf curd (FLC) sample had the highest protein (26.27%) and the fresh pumpkin leaf (FPL) had the least (11.25%). On the other hand, the dried leaf curd (DLC), the shade-dried and the sun-dried fluted pumpkin leaves had comparable (p>0.05) values (19.75 vs 23.08 vs 23.78%). The fat composition of the samples differed. The dried leaf curd samples had the least fat (0.93%) followed by fresh leaf curd (3.03%). The shade dried leaf had the highest fat (ether extract), which was different from others (p0.05) ash values (3.47 and 3.00%, respectively) and the dried leaf curd had the least (1.29%). The CHO levels of the samples differed (p0.05) values (61.30-62.87%). However, the dried leaf curd had the highest CHO (76.99%) (p0.05) levels (0.28 mg/100g respectively). On the other hand, the fresh leaf curd had significantly higher values (p<0.05) than the others. These study have revealed the proximate, beta-carotene and ascorbate composition of fluted pumpkin processed in different methods, hence, this is a vital tool in the hand of nutritionist and dietitians for proper management of patients and nutrition education.
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